Without a doubt, competitive dance is a sport

Opinion Feb 25, 2015 by Nadyne Esson, Guest columnist Cambridge Times

I started studying dance at the age of four in Toronto and continued through my teen years.

It required hard work, dedication and athleticism.

Dance was my sport of choice, although through my lifetime, dance was always seen as an art or hobby.

During the past couple of years, supporting my daughter on her competitive team, it has once again reinforced my belief that dance is a sport.

During a recent break from training at the dance studio, I sat down with a local dancer, Stephanie Saville, 18, to chat about this issue to discuss how the younger generation feels.

Here’s how it went:

Q: Why do you feel that dance is a sport?

A: I feel that dance is a sport because it is a physical and competitive activity that requires a lot of skill, physical abilities and mental toughness. To be a dancer you must be in good physical shape and it makes you want to push yourself to become better. Dancers, from an early age, are taught the correct way to point their feet and stretch their legs. I did some research online reading articles and found that professional dancers are some of the top athletes in the world.

Dance is a physically demanding sport and it is not easy to do. Dance studios compete with one another at competitions, which meets the criteria that a “sport” has to be a competition between two teams.

Q: What activities do you find require the most amount of training and how many hours a week do you train for dance versus sports?

A: I find that dance requires a larger amount of training because not only do you have to attend the choreography classes, but you also have to attend technique classes that help enhance your overall skill level.

I know many people that are at the dance studio over 20 hours a week and I have never even come close to practicing that much for rugby or any other sport.

Of course, training for a sport like rugby, soccer or football is still very extensive, but the amount of time spent practicing those sports does not come close to the amount of time a dancer spends practicing.

Q: What do you feel is the major difference between dance and other sports?

A: I feel the major difference between dance and other sports is that many people see dance as an individual, non-competitive sport, which it can be. If you dance for fun or as a hobby, you’re not competing against anyone.

Q: Why do you think society doesn’t recognize dance as a sport?

A: Many people are not aware of the competitive aspect of dance and they think it’s easy. Many people have been surprised when I tell them I dance competitively simply because they didn’t know studios compete against each other.

A large amount of society ignores the competitive world of dance. Also, many people believe dance is “too easy”. I can assure you dance is not easy. I’ve had numerous injuries over the years, and painful ones too. I sweat more in dance class than I do on the field sometimes, which again, people choose to ignore.

Q: If you had to choose between other sports and dance, which one do you think you would choose and why?

A: If I had to choose between other sports and dance, I would without a doubt, choose dance.

Even though I love sports and the physical aspect of tackling someone in rugby, dance is too important to me. When I dance, I forget about everything else that’s going on in my life and I just let myself go. I don’t have to worry about school or anything else; I can just dance and not have a care in the world.

The joy I get from dancing can never be replaced by playing any other sport.

Q: Do you think today’s teens think dance is a sport? Are attitudes shifting?

A: I do think teens have started to realize the physical aspect of dance and are starting to consider it a sport more than before.

Especially now that dance is televised more, teens are able to see just how hard and competitive the dance world is.

Nadyne Esson is the marketing co-ordinator and editor of KIN magazine, a national publication for Kin Canada (Kinsmen, Kinettes and Kin), based out of Cambridge. She started studying photography in 1995 and especially loves capturing the strength, art and beauty of dance.

Without a doubt, competitive dance is a sport

Opinion Feb 25, 2015 by Nadyne Esson, Guest columnist Cambridge Times

I started studying dance at the age of four in Toronto and continued through my teen years.

It required hard work, dedication and athleticism.

Dance was my sport of choice, although through my lifetime, dance was always seen as an art or hobby.

During the past couple of years, supporting my daughter on her competitive team, it has once again reinforced my belief that dance is a sport.

During a recent break from training at the dance studio, I sat down with a local dancer, Stephanie Saville, 18, to chat about this issue to discuss how the younger generation feels.

Here’s how it went:

Q: Why do you feel that dance is a sport?

A: I feel that dance is a sport because it is a physical and competitive activity that requires a lot of skill, physical abilities and mental toughness. To be a dancer you must be in good physical shape and it makes you want to push yourself to become better. Dancers, from an early age, are taught the correct way to point their feet and stretch their legs. I did some research online reading articles and found that professional dancers are some of the top athletes in the world.

Dance is a physically demanding sport and it is not easy to do. Dance studios compete with one another at competitions, which meets the criteria that a “sport” has to be a competition between two teams.

Q: What activities do you find require the most amount of training and how many hours a week do you train for dance versus sports?

A: I find that dance requires a larger amount of training because not only do you have to attend the choreography classes, but you also have to attend technique classes that help enhance your overall skill level.

I know many people that are at the dance studio over 20 hours a week and I have never even come close to practicing that much for rugby or any other sport.

Of course, training for a sport like rugby, soccer or football is still very extensive, but the amount of time spent practicing those sports does not come close to the amount of time a dancer spends practicing.

Q: What do you feel is the major difference between dance and other sports?

A: I feel the major difference between dance and other sports is that many people see dance as an individual, non-competitive sport, which it can be. If you dance for fun or as a hobby, you’re not competing against anyone.

Q: Why do you think society doesn’t recognize dance as a sport?

A: Many people are not aware of the competitive aspect of dance and they think it’s easy. Many people have been surprised when I tell them I dance competitively simply because they didn’t know studios compete against each other.

A large amount of society ignores the competitive world of dance. Also, many people believe dance is “too easy”. I can assure you dance is not easy. I’ve had numerous injuries over the years, and painful ones too. I sweat more in dance class than I do on the field sometimes, which again, people choose to ignore.

Q: If you had to choose between other sports and dance, which one do you think you would choose and why?

A: If I had to choose between other sports and dance, I would without a doubt, choose dance.

Even though I love sports and the physical aspect of tackling someone in rugby, dance is too important to me. When I dance, I forget about everything else that’s going on in my life and I just let myself go. I don’t have to worry about school or anything else; I can just dance and not have a care in the world.

The joy I get from dancing can never be replaced by playing any other sport.

Q: Do you think today’s teens think dance is a sport? Are attitudes shifting?

A: I do think teens have started to realize the physical aspect of dance and are starting to consider it a sport more than before.

Especially now that dance is televised more, teens are able to see just how hard and competitive the dance world is.

Nadyne Esson is the marketing co-ordinator and editor of KIN magazine, a national publication for Kin Canada (Kinsmen, Kinettes and Kin), based out of Cambridge. She started studying photography in 1995 and especially loves capturing the strength, art and beauty of dance.

Without a doubt, competitive dance is a sport

Opinion Feb 25, 2015 by Nadyne Esson, Guest columnist Cambridge Times

I started studying dance at the age of four in Toronto and continued through my teen years.

It required hard work, dedication and athleticism.

Dance was my sport of choice, although through my lifetime, dance was always seen as an art or hobby.

During the past couple of years, supporting my daughter on her competitive team, it has once again reinforced my belief that dance is a sport.

During a recent break from training at the dance studio, I sat down with a local dancer, Stephanie Saville, 18, to chat about this issue to discuss how the younger generation feels.

Here’s how it went:

Q: Why do you feel that dance is a sport?

A: I feel that dance is a sport because it is a physical and competitive activity that requires a lot of skill, physical abilities and mental toughness. To be a dancer you must be in good physical shape and it makes you want to push yourself to become better. Dancers, from an early age, are taught the correct way to point their feet and stretch their legs. I did some research online reading articles and found that professional dancers are some of the top athletes in the world.

Dance is a physically demanding sport and it is not easy to do. Dance studios compete with one another at competitions, which meets the criteria that a “sport” has to be a competition between two teams.

Q: What activities do you find require the most amount of training and how many hours a week do you train for dance versus sports?

A: I find that dance requires a larger amount of training because not only do you have to attend the choreography classes, but you also have to attend technique classes that help enhance your overall skill level.

I know many people that are at the dance studio over 20 hours a week and I have never even come close to practicing that much for rugby or any other sport.

Of course, training for a sport like rugby, soccer or football is still very extensive, but the amount of time spent practicing those sports does not come close to the amount of time a dancer spends practicing.

Q: What do you feel is the major difference between dance and other sports?

A: I feel the major difference between dance and other sports is that many people see dance as an individual, non-competitive sport, which it can be. If you dance for fun or as a hobby, you’re not competing against anyone.

Q: Why do you think society doesn’t recognize dance as a sport?

A: Many people are not aware of the competitive aspect of dance and they think it’s easy. Many people have been surprised when I tell them I dance competitively simply because they didn’t know studios compete against each other.

A large amount of society ignores the competitive world of dance. Also, many people believe dance is “too easy”. I can assure you dance is not easy. I’ve had numerous injuries over the years, and painful ones too. I sweat more in dance class than I do on the field sometimes, which again, people choose to ignore.

Q: If you had to choose between other sports and dance, which one do you think you would choose and why?

A: If I had to choose between other sports and dance, I would without a doubt, choose dance.

Even though I love sports and the physical aspect of tackling someone in rugby, dance is too important to me. When I dance, I forget about everything else that’s going on in my life and I just let myself go. I don’t have to worry about school or anything else; I can just dance and not have a care in the world.

The joy I get from dancing can never be replaced by playing any other sport.

Q: Do you think today’s teens think dance is a sport? Are attitudes shifting?

A: I do think teens have started to realize the physical aspect of dance and are starting to consider it a sport more than before.

Especially now that dance is televised more, teens are able to see just how hard and competitive the dance world is.

Nadyne Esson is the marketing co-ordinator and editor of KIN magazine, a national publication for Kin Canada (Kinsmen, Kinettes and Kin), based out of Cambridge. She started studying photography in 1995 and especially loves capturing the strength, art and beauty of dance.